Tag: US Supreme Court

December 2, 2020 / Podcast

In this episode Doug talks about the recent release of secular agendas to the Biden-Harris transition team to help restore the separation of church and state. One particular word change could make some Christian nationalist heads explode and it isn’t saying Happy Holidays. Doug then complains about the infighting between mainstream Democrats and progressives now that the election is over and why it’s only hurting Democrats. Finally Doug mentions the latest religious freedom perversion from the US Supreme Court it allows some churches to ignore state public health orders.

February 1, 2017 / Courts
image of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch with President Trump
Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch with President Trump

It doesn’t take much research or ‘soul searching’ to know that any Supreme Court nominee by President Trump would NOT be friendly to issues of concern to secular people. You don’t even need to do any Internet searching because the major freethought groups already have the goods on Neil Gorsuch. Obviously, any ‘little Scalia’ is no friend of ours.

January 3, 2016 / Courts
April 30, 2015 / Courts
October 2, 2014 / Courts
photo of Justice Antonin Scalia
Justice Antonin Scalia

Justice Antonin Scalia, one of the members of the conservative block on the United States Supreme Court, gave a speech Wednesday where he seemed to be supporting the separation of church and state. Which is odd because he has been one of the justices who wants to limit the scope of the 1st amendment so narrowly that it really means nothing. Is Justice Scalia warming to separation of church and state?

May 6, 2014 / Courts
Religion in government is okay if it is generic

In a 5-4 decision on Monday, the US Supreme Court said that the Town of Greece New York could open their town council meetings with a religious prayer. The majority on the court held that legislative prayers were not unconstitutional because they were traditional acts performed at government meetings. We’ve seen this argument before, it has been called Ceremonial Deism and it means a civic religion divorced of any specific religious meaning. I would think that Christians would be very upset that the court considers their religion ‘generic’. Just because Ceremonial Deism has been a tradition doesn’t mean it isn’t harmful.

One argument the court used to rule in favor of the Town of Greece was the old argument from tradition: